Day 13: Final Exam Review

Tomorrow is the Semester 1 Final Exam. We spent all of today reviewing. I had some games and then the last hour was given to them to review on their own using their assessments, supplemental review worksheets I made, and their review packet that I gave and I was there to answer questions.

All files are attached at the bottom of the post. Most winnings were candy (thank you amazon for this and this) and math pride.

I started with Jeopardy to review parallel lines and angle-sum theorems. This is something I made while student teaching and I do it with teams. I printed the slides so that if a group got it incorrect, another group could steal the points. I also added a “daily double” worth 1000 points (because I said it makes sense) to one of the 100 point questions to really throw them for a loop.

Next, I had Last Man Standing to review triangle congruence. This game is class vs. teacher. The class receives the prize of the last man that is left in the grid. I pair students up and then call on the pairs one at a time to pick which man to take out. The class is then responsible for asking the question that is behind that guy. There are some bad prizes (high five, fist bump, homework pass in my class since I don’t grade homework) and some better ones (extra credit, candy, extra break time). The class gets really into it at the end when you only have a few left.

Next, we played Dan Meyer’s Mathketball to review special segments in triangles. I play class vs. teacher. This one has kids asking why we don’t do this every day. I always hype it up by saying I was a starter on the basketball team when I was in high school (which was the same high school as about half of them – and their girl basketball team recently won sectionals). Then when I take my first shot granny-style I point out that I started sophomore year on my 7-girl team. Today, I actually was ahead for a good amount because the kids all insisted on taking the far shot and they could not make it. I have never seen so many scrap paper balls hit the rim of a recycling bin before. But they did end up winning.

Finally, we did a Trail activity to review quadrilaterals. In this version, the answers are somewhere else around the room that the students have to find. Students all write the letter that is next to the answer once they find it, and the teacher can check by seeing if the order is correct regardless of where they started. The teacher really doesn’t need to check if the student got through all 10 questions without repeating. I like this activity because it gets students moving and talking to different students depending on where they end up in the trail.

Trail Activity
Files:

Je m’amuse bien en classe quand les étudiants s’amusent!

Day 9: More Triangle Proofs

Today was a continuation on proving triangles congruent and parts of triangles congruent. We did a ton of just practicing proofs. One way we reviewed for our test was to have pairs at the board. I forgot who I saw this idea from so I’m sorry I can’t give credit, but I definitely didn’t think of it myself. I wish I would have known about this strategy last year. Anyway, I gave each pair two out of 4 possible proofs and made it so that the group at the board next to them wasn’t doing the same two. The partners had to be using a different colored marker. Then they just had to redraw the figure and givens and then do their best to complete the proof. It was great group work and I loved that the students were happy with their successes. Groups kept erasing their work but I did get a picture of one group. While most groups switched off on who was writing on the board, this group chose to have one person always write out the statements and reasons and the other person mark everything in the figure. I liked how they talked about the different parts of their proof, especially when one started writing ASA and the other one showed why it was really AAS. Great discussions, happy students, happy teacher.


Un jour pour la pratique n’ait jamais fait de mal à personne.

Day 8: Triangle Congruence

Our main activity today consisted of discovering the triangle congruence theorems and postulates. I used an activity (download below) where students had to construct 6 different triangles. Four of them can only form one triangle, two of them (AAA and SSA) don’t. I have students construct these in groups and then at the end I let them tape up their triangles on the board with all Triangle A’s together, Triangle B’s together, and so on. Students then do a gallery walk where they are asked to give what they notice about certain triangles. In the end, they see that SSS, SAS, ASA, and AAS gives us congruent triangles. One thing to note is that this take a long time. Even with groups of three and only six triangles, it took my class an hour to get them all done. Groups that finished early were asked to try to make different triangles with the same given information. But I think the time pays off in the end because the students can really see that AAA and SSA really don’t work and are pretty surprised that the others do.

   
 We then practiced a lot of proofs and got into CPCTC before they took a quiz on it. The quizzes were ok…not great…but this quiz usually is. I leave a lot of feedback on what could help them in their proofs and usually this helps them a lot. Hopefully they actually look at my feedback. I usually get some comment like, “Well I knew we had to use CPCTC in the proof during class because we just talked about CPCTC but then in the quiz all I could think of was No Choice Theorem.” No Choice Theorem?! You mean the thing we literally did one example with and then never touched on again? Ok…I’m still searching for the best way to help students with proofs in such a small time frame. I feel like during the regular year when this unit spans weeks, it would be easier for students to build up to their reasonings.

Les étudiants pensent que les preuves sont trop difficiles, mais il n’est que le début!