Circles Intro Desmos Polygraph

In my Honors Math II class I frequently am saying (both to my colleagues and my students) that we have so so so many topics to cover. It leads to a lot of boring days, in my opinion, of notes-practice-notes-practice-notes-practice blah blah blah. My learners don’t really complain – most have been in the honors track for a while and that’s kind of how it’s always gone for them. I do switch up how they practice and review and have done my fair share of discovery and VNPS activities, so I shouldn’t say it’s all the same. But we’re now on our last unit of the semester and it’s all about circles. The vocabulary that starts off this unit can be a bit overwhelming and we were starting this coming off two days of MAP testing and lost a day of the unit to a snow day, so I really wanted something engaging and meaningful that wouldn’t burn a lot of time. After asking the #MTBoS, I answered my own question with doing a Demos Polygraph activity. I edited one I had found from Burt Dixon to fit my introduction vocab a little better. Here it is:

https://teacher.desmos.com/polygraph/custom/5bfc6af09666cb74c78c477d

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It went really well! The kids really enjoyed it and were fully into it the whole time. I happened to end up with my evaluator in my room during it and she was really impressed, too. After the class was getting to the point where most were winning in 2-4 questions, I had them all draw a circle so we could put some of the things they noticed into formal vocabulary. So not only did I plan an engaging lesson, but I also didn’t skip the close! The best part was that my learners and I can now reference the Polygraph activity as we’re learning more things about circles. 🙂

I also got some other ideas from the #MTBoS about other discovery tools for circles that I would definitely do if I had more time. Check out my post on Twitter to see them.

Et encore, j’adore Desmos.

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Desmos Card Sort Is More Than Just Technology for Technology’s Sake

I just had my first formal observation and it was scheduled for last period on day 2/2 of factoring by grouping (polynomials with four terms). I was a little stressed when I found out about the observation.

Luckily the #MTBoS is the best and Meg @mathymeg07 and Sarah @mathequalslove gave me great ideas that helped me de-stress. I ended up settling on a Desmos card sort for practice, mainly because my evaluator has already said how impressed she is with my technology use. I would just make a sort where the students would match a polynomials with its factors (3 cards for each set). That led me to tweet about how it was a perfect example of technology for technology’s sake, which made me feel bad but my plans were due the day before already (even though I had just been assigned the observation).

But then I was thinking about it…and it really isn’t just technology for technology’s sake. Using the Desmos card sort gave me and the students way more information than a regular old worksheet. Ok well for the students they got confirmation that their answers could be correct if they were on the screen (which is not much more than me just giving a scrambled answer key or something). But also they gained engagement. There’s something about being on the Chromebooks that is just 10x more engaging than a worksheet. Like, seriously, in all of my classes there wasn’t one time where I caught a group on something they weren’t supposed to be on. Maybe I’m just bad at catching it, but I’m gonna go with they were engaged. And no, my classes are not perfect little angels who just do whatever I ask them. But the pairs that were just sitting there doing nothing were quickly caught and re-engaged (read on for how).

Also, I gained so much more with the card sort than I would have with just a worksheet. Students were in pairs and I had them make their names both of their first names together so I could manage better. I walked around with my iPad showing the dashboard, and I was able to see their work in real time! No more making rounds around the room and not finding out until 2 minutes before ending that a group did everything wrong. No more letting a group wait there for 10 minutes because they finished early (or just weren’t working) and just didn’t say anything!

I wish I had taken a screenshot in the middle of the class (this is just the first four groups from a class that had already finished) but, for instance, I could see right away that the Stefan Banach pair had a mismatch and could go over to them as soon as I was available before they made more mistakes like that. I could also see, for instance, that Diego and Kurt were ready for some extension questions and challenges since they were done earlier. Or I could use this to see that Mary’s pair needed someone from Diego’s pair to help them out since they were stuck on that screen for a while.

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Also, it was pretty easy to make. I made an 8 question Kuta worksheet, made sure none of the factors were the same but that there were some similar ones, and then typed them in. I think it took me half an hour while I watched TV to make.

So yeah, I wanted to use Desmos to impress my assistant principal. But really, in the end, I did what I think helped my students and me have the best practice for this topic.

Here’s the links to the card sorts that I’ve done like this:

Factor by Grouping: https://teacher.desmos.com/activitybuilder/custom/581e0a5a39d984e1059501f3

Factor quadratic trinomials: https://teacher.desmos.com/activitybuilder/custom/5812d0b1b9d4312e2ae3f184

J’adore Desmos et je vais trouver n’importe quelle raison de l’utiliser.